Category Archives: Book review

Book Reading Challenge 2019

I got this idea from the 2019 Book Resolutions Reading Challenge at Romance.com.au, then decided I needed to modify it for my own purposes and reading style. I’m going to report back on how well I have achieved this as the year progresses….so stay tuned!

  1. A Book Published in 2019
  2. A Book You Own But Never Read
  3. A Classic
  4. A Book Written by an Australian/New Zealand Author
  5. A Non-Fiction Book
  6. An LGBT+ Romance
  7. A Book with the Protagonist that Shares Your Occupation
  8. A Book That Has Been Made Into a Movie
  9. A Romance Novel With Diverse Lead Characters
  10. The Bestseller of Your Birth Year
  11. A Translated Romance Novel
  12. A Historical Romance Set in Ancient Times
  13. A Book of Short Stories
  14. A Book Someone Gave You/Recommended
  15. A Book You Chose Based on the Cover Alone
  16. A book of free verse or poetry
  17. Banned Novel
  18. A Book You Started and Never Finished
  19. A Book You Can Read in One Sitting

Do you want to join me? If so please leave a comment below and we can bookclub our way through this list!

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Can you Dance? by Sally Morgan

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Written by Sally Morgan, illustrated by Kathy Arbon.
Written by one of Australia’s best loved authors, this board book will get toddlers and preschoolers up off their feet following the actions of the animals featured in the book. They’ll soon be flapping their arms like a scary magpie’s wings, stomping their feet like a cheeky wombat and dancing like a silly lizard, along with the actions of five other animals.
Beautifully illustrated by Kathy Arbon, this book will soon become a family favourite as everyone shows how they can dance. I bought this for my niece and my great niece to enjoy and learn.

Read this because:

You want an exciting book that will make you and your young one engaged from the start.  Sally Morgan not only teaches how to count, but more importantly to move like the animals depicted here. Really great Australian Fiction.

 

Catching Teller Crow by Ambelin and Ezekiel Kwaymullina

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Nothing’s been the same for Beth Teller since she died. Her dad, a detective, is the only one who can see and hear her – and he’s drowning in grief. But now they have a mystery to solve together. Who is Isobel Catching, and what’s her connection to the fire that killed a man? What happened to the people who haven’t been seen since the fire? As Beth unravels the mystery, she finds a shocking story lurking beneath the surface of a small town, and a friendship that lasts beyond one life and into another.

Read it because:

Catching Teller Crow is an original tale that both surprises and informs. Told by two different narrators, whose different styles in narration are marked either by prose or verse, we are drawn into their worlds. I was carried forward through a tale of institutionalisation of children, missing girls, grief and loss.
The book for me is proof that you can tell a story with strong Indigenous female characters. Catching, Teller and Crow are drawn from the streets of every regional town I’ve been to. The authors have drawn a regional town that could be anywhere in Australia. A town, and society, that is still hiding the secrets of shame from its past and the presence.
The lead characters encounter racism, violence, terrible historic injustices and corruption within the police force, all of which are still current themes that need to be discussed openly. The last half of the book sensitively addresses what happens when people turn a blind eye to violence and allow it to flourish and destroy lives.
The topics of grief and loss are sensitively handled, and allow an opportunity to discuss how grief and loss are addressed in our society. Through the characters journeys we gain a better understanding of how hard grief is as an emotion to deal with, especially for those who have no coping mechanisms.
This is book that can be used to teach historical and contemporary themes, as well as opening up the conversation about violence to women. Catching Teller Crow can also be used to supplement the Australian curriculum topic of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures.

Ta-Nehisi Coates – Black Panther And The Crew #1

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Black Panther, Storm, Luke Cage, Misty Knight and Manifold band together to take on a dangerous wave of street-level threats in this new ongoing series by co-writers Ta-Nehisi Coates (New York Times best-selling author of Between the World and Me and Marvel’s Black Panther) and Yona Harvey (Black Panther: World of Wakanda) and legendary artist Butch Guice! The death of a Harlem activist kicks off a mystery that will reveal surprising new secrets about the Marvel Universe’s past and set the stage for a big story in the Marvel Universe’s near future. Fear, hate and violence loom, but don’t worry, The Crew’s got this: “We are the streets.”

Read it because:

You need a new comic book title, that embraces diversity and also the lessons of history. A powerful book that helps the non-American understand what is happening in America. I found it incredibly powerful and have started book clubbing with my child…..Best comic of this year – 2018.

Ten of Australia’s best literary comics by Gabriel Clark

With news that the Man Booker Prize long list includes a graphic novel for the first time, the spotlight is on comics as a literary form. That’s a welcome development; the comic is one of the oldest kinds of storytelling we have and a powerful artform.

To read more of this article please go here.

Nyxia Unleashed by Scott Reintgen

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By Hook Or By Book, Book Reviews, News, and Other Stuff did a book review recently on Nyxia Unleashed. I read the book review and jumped onto the trusty Library website and ordered the book in to read.

The quick synopsis is:

Emmett Atwater thought Babel’s game sounded easy. Get points. Get paid. Go home. But it didn’t take long for him to learn that Babel’s competition was full of broken promises, none darker or more damaging than the last one.

Now Emmett and the rest of the Genesis survivors must rally and forge their own path through a new world. Their mission from Babel is simple: extract nyxia, the most valuable material in the universe, and play nice with the indigenous Adamite population.

But Emmett and the others quickly realize they are caught between two powerful forces—Babel and the Adamites—with clashing desires. Will the Genesis team make it out alive before it’s too late?

Read it because:

You loved the first book and want to find out what happens to Emmett Atwater. However don’t expect it to be the same as the initial amazing book. Great diverse cast – suitable for the upper secondary school.

Black Panther – what next?

Alex Brown has put together a list of books you need to read to continue Wakanda forever….I’ve started to read through the list….will you join me in this bookclub?

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